The World of the Pharoahs

Fragment from sarcophagus of Ramses VI. Conglomerate, Tomb of Ramses VI, Valley of the Kings, Egypt, 1143-1136 BC

Fragment from sarcophagus of Ramses VI. Conglomerate, Tomb of Ramses VI, Valley of the Kings, Egypt, 1143-1136 BC

Egyptian Pharaohs presented themselves as all-powerful and pious: brave military leaders who extended the boundaries of Egypt, while satisfying the gods. Pharaohs styled themselves as ‘ruler of the Two Lands’, uniting Egypt, and as ‘son of Ra’, as if directly descended from the gods. They were an intermediary between the people and these gods, responsible for building temples and performing rituals, ensuring Egypt’s safety from enemies, and maintaining its prosperity.

Cleveland Museum of Art has teamed up with the British Museum to create the current exhibit Pharoah: King of Ancient Egypt. This exhibition (03/13/2016 to 06/12/2016) explores the ideals, symbolism and ideology of Egyptian kingship, but also seeks to uncover the realities behind these images. The rulers of this land were not always male, nor even always Egyptian. At times, Egypt was divided by civil war, conquered by foreign powers or ruled by competing kings. Assassination plots and coups are also attested. While some kings were revered – such as Thutmosis III who expanded Egypt’s empire to its largest extent – others were the subject of satire. Many of the objects surviving from ancient Egypt project the image Pharaoh wanted us to see – but this exhibition also explores the realities and challenges of ruling an ancient Empire.

Temple of Edifu by John Federick Lewis.

Also, continuing till May 26, 2016 is the exhibit Pyramids and Sphyxes includes watercolor of Temple of Edifu by John Federick Lewis.

Cleveland Public Library’s Fine Arts and History Department collections offer many resources to supplement your study of these Egyptian wonders and to learn more about artists who worked to capture it’s history and beauty.Temples And Tombs

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