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    • Falling behind? : boom, bust, and the global race for scientific talent
      Falling behind? : boom, bust, and the global race for scientific talent
      Michael S. Teitelbaum.
      "Is the United States falling behind in the global race for scientific and engineering talent? Are U.S. employers facing shortages of the skilled workers that they need to compete in a globalized world? Such claims from some employers and educators have been widely embraced by mainstream media and political leaders, and have figured prominently in recent policy debates about education, federal expenditures, tax policy, and immigration. Falling Behind? offers careful examinations of the existing evidence and of its use by those involved in these debates. These concerns are by no means a recent phenomenon. Examining historical precedent, Michael Teitelbaum highlights five episodes of alarm about "falling behind" that go back nearly seventy years to the end of World War II. In each of these episodes the political system responded by rapidly expanding the supply of scientists and engineers, but only a few years later political enthusiasm or economic demand waned. Booms turned to busts, leaving many of those who had been encouraged to pursue science and engineering careers facing disheartening career prospects. Their experiences deterred younger and equally talented students from following in their footsteps--thereby sowing the seeds of the next cycle of alarm, boom, and bust. Falling Behind? examines these repeated cycles up to the present, shedding new light on the adequacy of the science and engineering workforce for the current and future needs of the United States."-- Publisher's description.
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    • Eureka! : discovering your inner scientist
    • Can crocodiles cry? : amazing answers to mind-blowing questions
    • The mathematics devotional : celebrating the wisdom and beauty of mathematics
      The mathematics devotional : celebrating the wisdom and beauty of mathematics
      Clifford A. Pickover.
      "From prolific polymath Clifford Pickover-the ingenious author of The Math Book and The Physics Book-comes a stunning and inspirational volume that celebrates the beauty and wisdom of mathematics. Cliff's devotional will feature one thought-provoking and original quotation on a mathematics-related theme, in addition to a stunning example of mathematically generated art, for every day of the year. Readers will also learn which notable mathematicians share their own birthdays, discovering more about them in a brief biographical dictionary at the back of the book. In an appealing small, chunky hardcover format, The Mathematician's Devotional will be a wonderful gift for math enthusiasts worldwide, young and old"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Finding zero : a mathematician's odyssey to uncover the origins of numbers
      Finding zero : a mathematician's odyssey to uncover the origins of numbers
      Amir D. Aczel.
      "The invention of numerals is perhaps the greatest abstraction the human mind has ever created. Virtually everything in our lives is digital, numerical, or quantified. The story of how and where we got these numerals, which we so depend on, has for thousands of years been shrouded in mystery. Finding Zero is an adventure filled saga of Amir Aczel's lifelong obsession: to find the original sources of our numerals. Aczel has doggedly crisscrossed the ancient world, scouring dusty, moldy texts, cross examining so-called scholars who offered wildly differing sets of facts, and ultimately penetrating deep into a Cambodian jungle to find a definitive proof. Here, he takes the reader along for the ride. The history begins with the early Babylonian cuneiform numbers, followed by the later Greek and Roman letter numerals. Then Aczel asks the key question: where do the numbers we use today, the so-called Hindu-Arabic numerals, come from? It is this search that leads him to explore uncharted territory, to go on a grand quest into India, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and ultimately into the wilds of Cambodia. There he is blown away to find the earliest zero--the keystone of our entire system of numbers--on a crumbling, vine-covered wall of a seventh-century temple adorned with eaten-away erotic sculptures. While on this odyssey, Aczel meets a host of fascinating characters: academics in search of truth, jungle trekkers looking for adventure, surprisingly honest politicians, shameless smugglers, and treacherous archaeological thieves--who finally reveal where our numbers come from. "-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Student workbook : Intermediate algebra for college students, ninth edition
      Student workbook : Intermediate algebra for college students, ninth edition
      Allen Angel, Monroe Community College, Dennis Runde, State College of Florida.

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    • Hands-on programming with R
    • The complete idiot's guide to trigonometry
      The complete idiot's guide to trigonometry
      by Izolda Fotiyeva and Dmitriy Fotiyev.
      Provides plain-English explanations of the most challenging aspects of trig, plus numerous practice problems, and their easy-to-follow solutions. This helpful guide is the next best thing to a personal trigonometry tutor!
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    • Solar system maps : from antiquity to the space age
      Solar system maps : from antiquity to the space age
      Nick Kanas.
      In recent years, there has been increased interest in our Solar System. This has been prompted by the launching of giant orbiting telescopes and space probes, the discovery of new planetary moons and heavenly bodies that orbit the Sun, and the demotion of Pluto as a planet. In one generation, our place in the heavens has been challenged, but this is not unusual. Throughout history, there have been a number of such world views. Initially, Earth was seen as the center of the universe and surrounded by orbiting planets and stars. Then the Sun became the center of the cosmos. Finally, there was no center, just a vast array of galaxies with individual stars, some with their own retinue of planets. This allowed our Solar System to be differentiated from deep-sky objects, but it didn't lose its mystery as more and more remarkable bodies were discovered within its boundaries.
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    • How to read the solar system : a guide to the stars and planets
      How to read the solar system : a guide to the stars and planets
      Chris North and Paul Abel.
      The Solar System - so what is it? This book looks at all the major players, including our more familiar neighbours - the Sun, the planets and their moons - the occasional visitors to our planet - asteroids, meteors and comets - as well as distant stars and what might be beyond our Solar System - Earth Mark II?
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    • Abrupt impacts of climate change : anticipating surprises
      Abrupt impacts of climate change : anticipating surprises
      Committee on Understanding and Monitoring Abrupt Climate Change and its Impacts. Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council of the National Academies.

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    • Secrets of the greatest snow on earth : weather, climate change, and finding deep powder in Utah's Wasatch Mountains and around the world
      Secrets of the greatest snow on earth : weather, climate change, and finding deep powder in Utah's Wasatch Mountains and around the world
      Jim Steenburgh.
      "Snowriders in Utah have long claimed to have the best snow on Earth. Some contend that moisture from the Great Salt Lake fuels storms, while the western deserts dry out the snow to create light, magic flakes. In Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth, Jim Steenburgh investigates Wasatch weather lore, exposing the myths, explaining the reality, and revealing why Utah's powder lives up to its reputation. Chapters explore mountain weather, avalanches and snow safety, historical accounts of weather events and snow conditions, and the basics of weather and climate forecasting. Steenburgh explains what creates the best snow for skiing and snowboarding in accurate and accessible language and illustrates his points with 150 color photographs, making Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth a helpful tool for planning vacations and staying safe during mountain adventures. This insider's guide to the weather and climate of the Wasatch Mountains also serves as a guide to mountain weather and snow climates around the world. Snowriders, weather enthusiasts, meteorologists, students of snow science, and anyone else who dreams of deep powder and bluebird skies will want to get their mittens on Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth"-Provided by publisher.
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    • 1,001 chemistry practice problems for dummies
      1,001 chemistry practice problems for dummies
      by Heather Hattori and Richard H. Langley.
      This handy guide gives you opportunities to practice solving problems that you'll encounter in your chemistry course. Every practice question includes not only a solution but a detailed explanation.
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    • Rare : the high-stakes race to satisfy our need for the scarcest metals on Earth
      Rare : the high-stakes race to satisfy our need for the scarcest metals on Earth
      Keith Veronese.
      "How will your life change when the supply of tantalum dries up? You may have never heard of this unusual metal, but without it smartphones would be instantly less omniscient, video game systems would falter, and laptops fail. Tantalum is not alone. Rhodium. Osmium. Niobium. Such refugees from the bottom of the periodic table are key components of many consumer products like cell phones, hybrid car batteries, and flat screen televisions, as well as sophisticated medical devices and even weapon systems. Their versatile properties have led manufacturers to seek these elements out to maximize longevity, value, and efficiency, but not without a human price. In addition to explaining the chemistry behind rare earth metals, Rare delves into the economic and geopolitical issues surrounding these "conflict minerals," blending tales of financial and political struggles with glimpses into the human lives that are shattered by the race to secure them. In the past decade, the Congo has been ravaged by tribal wars fought to obtain control of tantalum, tungsten, and tin supplies in the region, with over five million people dying at the crossroads of supply and demand. A burgeoning black market in China, Africa, and India is propped up by school-age children retrieving and purifying these metals while risking their lives and health in the process. Fears of future political struggles inside China, the world's largest supplier of these metals, have already sent the United States, Great Britain, and Japan racing to find alternative sources. Will scientists be able to create lab substitutes for some or all of these metals? Will Afghanistan be the next big supplier of rare metals? What happens when the limited supply runs out? Whatever the answers, it is clear that our modern lifestyle, dependent on technology, is far from stable"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Island on fire : the extraordinary story of a forgotten volcano that changed the world
    • Extinct Madagascar : picturing the island's past
    • Aristotle's ladder, Darwin's tree : the evolution of visual metaphors for biological order
    • Human variation : a genetic perspective on diversity, race, and medicine
      Human variation : a genetic perspective on diversity, race, and medicine
      edited by Aravinda Chakravarti, John Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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    • Stitching the West back together : conservation of working landscapes
      Stitching the West back together : conservation of working landscapes
      edited by Susan Charnley, Thomas E. Sheridan, and Gary P. Nabhan.

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    • Marine historical ecology in conservation : applying the past to manage for the future
      Marine historical ecology in conservation : applying the past to manage for the future
      edited by John N. Kittinger, Loren McClenachan, Keryn B. Gedan, Louise K. Blight
      "This volume provides a blueprint for managing the challenges of ocean conservation using marine historical ecology--an area of study evolving as societies confront ocean ecosystems that are being drastically altered by human activity. Applying the practice of historical ecology developed in terrestrial environments, Marine Historical Ecology guides the creation of historical baselines for marine species and ecosystems in order to inform and improve conservation and management efforts"--Provided by publisher.
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    • Studying Wisconsin : the life of Increase Lapham, early chronicler of plants, rocks, rivers, mounds and all things Wisconsin
      Studying Wisconsin : the life of Increase Lapham, early chronicler of plants, rocks, rivers, mounds and all things Wisconsin
      Martha Bergland & Paul G. Hayes.
      "With masterful storytelling, Bergland and Hayes demonstrate how Lapham blended his ravenous curiosity with an equable temperament and a passion for detail to create a legacy that is still relevant today. -John Gurda In this long overdue tribute to Wisconsin's first scientist, authors Martha Bergland and Paul G. Hayes explore the remarkable life and achievements of Increase Lapham (1811-1875). Lapham's ability to observe, understand, and meticulously catalog the natural world marked all of his work, from his days as a teenage surveyor on the Erie Canal to his last great contribution as state geologist. Self-taught, Lapham mastered botany, geology, archaeology, limnology, mineralogy, engineering, meteorology, and cartography. A prolific writer, his 1844 guide to the territory was the first book published in Wisconsin. Asked late in life which field of science was his specialty, he replied simply, "I am studying Wisconsin." Lapham identified and preserved thousands of botanical specimens. He surveyed and mapped Wisconsin's effigy mounds. He was a force behind the creation of the National Weather Service, lobbying for a storm warning system to protect Great Lakes sailors. Told in compelling detail through Lapham's letters, journals, books, and articles, Studying Wisconsin chronicles the life and times of Wisconsin's pioneer citizen-scientist"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Basic illustrated medicinal plants
      Basic illustrated medicinal plants
      Jim Meuninck.
      "An information-packed tool for the novice or handy reference for the veteran. Distills years of knowledge into an affordable and portable book. With this guide, you'll discover how to identify medicinal plants in the contiguous United States"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Trees of Eastern North America
      Trees of Eastern North America
      Gil Nelson, Christopher J. Earle, and Richard Spellenberg
      Covers 825 species, including all the native and naturalized trees of the United States and Canada as far west as the Great Plains. Descriptions present details of size, shape, growth habit, bark, leaves, flowers, fruit, flowering and fruiting times, habitat, and range maps for native species, as well as specially commissioned artwork, up-to-date taxonomy and names, information on the most recently naturalized species, keys to leaves and twigs, and an introduction to tree identification, forest ecology, and plant classification and structure.
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    • Dragonflies Q&A guide : fascinating facts about their life in the wild
    • Longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Disteniidae) : primary types of the Smithsonian Institution
      Longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Disteniidae) : primary types of the Smithsonian Institution
      Steven W. Lingafelter, Eugenio H. Nearns, Gerard L. Tavakilian, Miguel A. Monne, Michael Biondi.

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    • The hunt for the golden mole : all creatures great and small, and why they matter
      The hunt for the golden mole : all creatures great and small, and why they matter
      Richard Girling.
      Chronicles the history of the conservation movement and the scientific debate about extinction as reflected by the search for the elusive Somali golden mole.
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    • The cultural lives of whales and dolphins
    • Wild man from Borneo : a cultural history of the orangutan
      Wild man from Borneo : a cultural history of the orangutan
      Robert Cribb, Helen Gilbert, Helen Tiffin.
      Offers the first comprehensive history of the human-orangutan encounter. Arguably the most humanlike of all the great apes, particularly in intelligence and behavior, the orangutan has been cherished, used, and abused ever since it was first brought to the attention of Europeans in the seventeenth century. The red ape has engaged the interest of scientists, philosophers, artists, and the public at large in a bewildering array of guises that have by no means been exclusively zoological or ecological. One reason for such a long-term engagement with a being found only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra is that, like its fellow great apes, the orangutan stands on that most uncomfortable dividing line between human and animal, existing, for us, on what has been called b3sthe dangerous edge of the garden of nature.b4s Beginning with the scientific discovery of the red ape more than three hundred years ago, this work goes on to examine the ways in which its human attributes have been both recognized and denied in science, philosophy, travel literature, popular science, literature, theatre, museums, and film. The authors offer a provocative analysis of the origin of the name b3sorangutan,b4s trace how the ape has been recruited to arguments on topics as diverse as slavery and rape, and outline the history of attempts to save the animal from extinction. Today, while human populations increase exponentially, that of the orangutan is in dangerous decline. The remaining b3swild men of Borneob4s are under increasing threat from mining interests, logging, human population expansion, and the widespread destruction of forests. The authors hope that this history will, by adding to our knowledge of this fascinating being, assist in some small way in their preservation.
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    • The man who touched his own heart : true tales of science, surgery, and mystery
    • Sex on earth : a celebration of animal reproduction
      Sex on earth : a celebration of animal reproduction
      Jules Howard.
      A journey of discovery through the spectacular intricacies of reproduction in the animal kingdom.
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    • The predictive mind
      The predictive mind
      Jakob Hohwy.
      A new theory is taking hold in neuroscience. It is the theory that the brain is essentially a hypothesis-testing mechanism, one that attempts to minimise the error of its predictions about the sensory input it receives from the world. It is an attractive theory because powerful theoretical arguments support it, and yet it is at heart stunningly simple. Jakob Hohwy explains and explores this theory from the perspective of cognitive science and philosophy. The key argument throughout The Predictive Mind is that the mechanism explains the rich, deep, and multifaceted character of our conscious perception. It also gives a unified account of how perception is sculpted by attention, and how it depends on action. The mind is revealed as having a fragile and indirect relation to the world. Though we are deeply in tune with the world we are also strangely distanced from it. The first part of the book sets out how the theory enables rich, layered perception. The theory's probabilistic and statistical foundations are explained using examples from empirical research and analogies to different forms of inference. The second part uses the simple mechanism in an explanation of problematic cases of how we manage to represent, and sometimes misrepresent, the world in health as well as in mental illness. The third part looks into the mind, and shows how the theory accounts for attention, conscious unity, introspection, self and the privacy of our mental world. -- Provided by publisher.
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    • The brain's way of healing : remarkable discoveries and recoveries from the frontiers of neuroplasticity
      The brain's way of healing : remarkable discoveries and recoveries from the frontiers of neuroplasticity
      Norman Doidge, M.D.
      " The New York Times bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness. In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience-what we call neuroplasticity. His revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us-light, sound, vibration, movement-which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brain's own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain's complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain's Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brain's performance and health"-- Provided by publisher.
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