Search in:
    Find:

    Literature Poetry and Writing

     

    • Demosthenes of Athens and the fall of classical Greece
      Demosthenes of Athens and the fall of classical Greece
      Ian Worthington.
      Demosthenes (384-322 BC) profoundly shaped one of the most eventful epochs in antiquity. His political career spanned three decades, during which time Greece fell victim to Macedonian control, first under Philip II and then Alexander the Great. Demosthenes' courageous defiance of Macedonian imperialism cost him his life but earned him a reputation as one of history's outstanding patriots. He also enjoyed a brilliant and lucrative career as a speechwriter, and his rhetorical skills are still emulated today by statesmen and politicians. Yet he was a sickly child with a challenging speech impediment, who was swindled out of much of his family's estate by unscrupulous guardians. His story is therefore one of triumph over adversity.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Lin Shu, Inc. : translation and the making of modern Chinese culture
    • Holocaust literature : a history and guide
      Holocaust literature : a history and guide
      David G. Roskies and Naomi Diamant.
      "What is Holocaust literature? When does it begin and how is it changing? Is there an essential core of diaries, eyewitness accounts of the concentration camps, tales of individual survival in hiding? Is it the same everywhere: in the West as in the East, in Australia as in the Americas, in poetry as in prose? Is this literature sacred and sui generis, or can it be studied in the light of other literatures? What of the perpetrators and bystanders, the hidden children, the children of Holocaust survivors: Do they speak with the same authority? What works of Holocaust literature will be read a hundred years from now--and why? Here, for the first time and told from beginning to end, is an historical survey of Holocaust literature in all genres, countries, and major languages. Beginning in wartime, it proceeds from the literature of mobilization and mourning in the Free World to the vast and varied literature produced in the Nazi-occupied ghettos, the bunkers and places of hiding, the transit and concentrations camps. Within weeks of the liberation, in displaced persons camps, a new memorial and testamentary literature begins to take shape. Moving from Europe to Israel, the U.S., and beyond, the authors situate the writings by real and proxy witnesses within three distinct postwar periods: a period of "communal memory," still internal and internecine; a period of "provisional memory" in the '60s and '70s that witnesses the birth of a self-conscious Holocaust genre; to the period of "authorized memory" in which we live today, following the collapse of the Soviet Union (1989-91), and the opening of the US Holocaust Museum (1993). Twenty book covers - first editions in their original languages - and an eminently readable guide to the "first hundred books" together show the multilingual scope, historical depth, the moral and artistic range of this extraordinary body of writing."--Publisher's website.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Vampires are us : understanding our love affair with the immortal dark side
      Vampires are us : understanding our love affair with the immortal dark side
      Margot Adler.
      ""Vampires. Why do we care? In these pages you will find what is very simply, the most literate, imaginative, and just plain fascinating answer to that question ever written." Whitley Strieber. In a culture that does not do death particularly well, we are obsessed with mortality. Margot Adler writes, "Vampires let us play with death and the issue of mortality. They let us ponder what it would mean to be truly long lived. Would the long view allow us to see the world differently, imagine social structures differently? Would it increase or decrease our reverence for the planet? Vampires allow us to ask questions we usually bury."As Adler, a longtime NPR correspondent and question asker, sat vigil at her dying husband's bedside, she found herself newly drawn to vampire novels and their explorations of mortality. Over the next four years--by now she has read more than 270 vampire novels, from teen to adult, from gothic to modern, from detective to comic--she began to see just how each era creates the vampires it needs. Dracula, an Eastern European monster, was the perfect vehicle for 19th-century England's fear of outsiders and of disease seeping in through its large ports. In 1960s America, Dark Shadows gave us the morally conflicted vampire struggling against his own predatory nature, who still enthralls us today. Think Spike and Angel, Stefan and Damon, Bill and Eric, the Cullens. Vampires Are Us explores the issues of power, politics, morality, identity, and even the fate of the planet that show up in vampire novels today. Perhaps, Adler suggests, our blood is oil, perhaps our prey is the planet. Perhaps vampires are us"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Life coaching for writers : an essential guide to realising your creative potential
      Life coaching for writers : an essential guide to realising your creative potential
      Sarah-Beth Watkins.
      "Self-help and personal development guide for every writer that will help you to unleash your creative potential. Whether you are a fiction or non-fiction writer, it's not always easy to be creative-- life conspires to throw up obstacles, fears, and external influences that get in the way of our writing lives. This book is aimed at writers who know that they want to write but are struggling to realise their full potential. It is specifically aimed at more experienced writers who have had some successes and want to move from the life of an amateur scribbler to a professional writer" -- Page [4] of cover.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The lost second book of Aristotle's Poetics
    • The medieval romance of Alexander : Jehan Wauquelin's The deeds and conquests of Alexander the Great
      The medieval romance of Alexander : Jehan Wauquelin's The deeds and conquests of Alexander the Great
      [Jehan Wauquelin]
      The figure of Alexander the Great haunted the medieval imagination - as much as Arthur, as much as Charlemagne. His story was translated more often in medieval Europe than any work except the Gospels. The Deeds and Conquests of Alexander the Great is Jehan Wauquelin's superb compendium, written for the Burgundian court in the mid-fifteenth century, which draws together all the key elements of the Alexandrian tradition. With great clarity and intelligence Wauquelin produced a redaction of all the major Alexander romances of the twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth centuries - including the verse Roman d'Alexandre, The Vows of the Peacock and La Venjance Alixandre - to tell the whole story of Alexander's miraculous birth and childhood, his conquests of Persia and India, his battles with fabulous beasts and outlandish peoples, his journeys in the sky and under the sea, his poisoning at Babylon and the vengeance taken by his son. This is an accomplished and exciting work by a notable writer at the Burgundian court who perfectly understood the appeal of the great conqueror to ambitious dukes intent upon extending their dominions.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • For love or for money : Balzac's rhetorical realism
    • Finding the woman who didn't exist : the curious life of Gisele d'Estoc
      Finding the woman who didn't exist : the curious life of Gisele d'Estoc
      Melanie C. Hawthorne.
      Gisele d'Estoc was the pseudonym of a nineteenth-century French woman writer and, it turns out, artist who, among other things, was accused of being a bomb-planting anarchist, the cross-dressing lover of writer Guy de Maupassant, and the fighter of at least one duel with another woman, inspiring Bayard's famous painting on the subject. The true identity of this enigmatic woman remained unknown and was even considered fictional until recently, when Melanie C. Hawthorne resurrected d'Estoc's discarded story from the annals of forgotten history. Finding the Woman Who Didn't Exist begins with the claim by expert literary historians of France on the eve of World War II that the woman then known only as Gisele d'Estoc was merely a hoax. More than fifty years later, Hawthorne not only proves that she did exist but also uncovers details about her fascinating life and career, along the way adding to our understanding of nineteenth-century France, literary culture, and gender identity. Hawthorne explores the intriguing life of the real d'Estoc, explaining why others came to doubt the "experts" and following the threads of evidence that the latter overlooked. In focusing on how narratives are shaped for particular audiences at particular times, Hawthorne also tells "the story of the story," which reveals how the habits of thought fostered by the humanities continue to matter beyond the halls of academe.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Diary of the dark years, 1940-1944 : collaboration, resistance, and daily life in occupied Paris
      Diary of the dark years, 1940-1944 : collaboration, resistance, and daily life in occupied Paris
      Jean Guehenno
      "Jean Guehenno's [diary] ... is the most oft-quoted piece of testimony on life in occupied France. A sharply observed record of day-to-day life under Nazi rule in Paris and a bitter commentary on literary life in those years, it has also been called 'a remarkable essay on courage and cowardice' ... Here, David Ball provides not only the first English translation of this important historical document, but also the first ever annotated, corrected edition"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The divine comedy
      The divine comedy
      Dante
      Clive James presents the crowning achievement of his career: a monumental translation of Dante's Divine Comedy. The Divine Comedy is the precursor of modern literature, and Clive James' new translation - his life's work and decades in the making - presents Dante's entire epic poem in a single song. While many poets and translators have attempted to capture the full glory of The Divine Comedy in English, many have fallen short. Victorian verse translations established an unfortunate tradition of reproducing the sprightly rhyming measures of Dante but at the same time betraying the strain on the translator's powers of invention. For Dante, the dramatic human stories of Hell were exciting, but the spiritual studies of Purgatory and the sublime panoramas of Heaven were no less so. In this incantatory new translation, James - defying the convention by writing in quatrains - tackles these problems head-on and creates a striking and hugely accessible translation that gives us The Divine Comedy as a whole, unified, and dramatic work.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Inventing Hell : Dante, the Bible and eternal torment
      Inventing Hell : Dante, the Bible and eternal torment
      Jon M. Sweeney.
      "Hell: The word means terror, darkness, and eternal separation from God. Some people think the Bible is clear about hell, but what if they're mistaken? With gripping narrative and solid scholarship, Sweeney charts hell's "evolution" from the Old Testament underworld Sheol, through history and literature, to the greatest influencer of all: Dante's Inferno. He reveals how the modern idea of hell is based mostly on Dante's imaginative genius-but in the process, he offers a more constructive understanding of the afterlife than ever before. Disturbing and enthralling, Sweeney will forever alter what we think happens to us after we die-and more importantly, he will make us reconsider how we live"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Cruelty and laughter : forgotten comic literature and the unsentimental Eighteenth Century
    • Middleton and Rowley : forms of collaboration in the Jacobean playhouse
      Middleton and Rowley : forms of collaboration in the Jacobean playhouse
      David Nicol.
      "Can the inadvertent clashes between collaborators produce more powerful effects than their concordances? For Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, the playwriting team best known for their tragedy The Changeling, disagreements and friction proved quite beneficial for their work. This first full-length study of Middleton and Rowley uses their plays to propose a new model for the study of collaborative authorship in early modern English drama. David Nicol highlights the diverse forms of collaborative relationships that factor into a play's meaning, including playwrights, actors, companies, playhouses, and patrons. This kaleidoscopic approach, which views the plays from all these perspectives, throws new light on the Middleton-Rowley oeuvre and on early modern dramatic collaboration as a whole."--Pub. desc.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Coriolanus
      Coriolanus
      by William Shakespeare

      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The complicity of friends : how George Eliot, G. H. Lewes, and John Hughlings-Jackson encoded Herbert Spencer's secret
    • The Edinburgh companion to Sir Walter Scott
      The Edinburgh companion to Sir Walter Scott
      edited by Fiona Robertson.
      This is a comprehensive collection devoted to the work of Sir Walter Scott, drawing on the innovative research and scholarship which have revitalised the study of the whole range of his exceptionally diverse writing in recent years.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Maeve Binchy : the biography
      Maeve Binchy : the biography
      Piers Dudgeon.
      "Maeve Binchy's novels sold more than 40 million copies worldwide, and when she died on July 30th 2012, she did so as Ireland's best-loved writer. With bestselling books such as Light a Penny Candle, Circle of Friends, Tara Road, Evening Class, and A Week in Winter, which was published four months after her death, no one else told stories like Maeve Binchy. Humane, down-to-earth, and funny, her novels captured imaginations on both sides of the Atlantic in a way that most authors only dream of." -- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Dear life
      Dear life
      Dennis O'Driscoll.
      Irish poet Dennis O'Driscoll's new poems engage with contemporary issues, the internet era, the compensation culture, global warming as well as the timeless topics of working and aging, loving and dying, God and Mammon. His poems give voice to twenty first century Western attitudes towards religion, while the ambitious title sequence attempts a rigorous exploration of the purpose of human life.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Icons of African American literature : the Black literary world
      Icons of African American literature : the Black literary world
      Yolanda Williams Page, editor.
      Provides extensive coverage of some of the most notable figures in African American literature, including Alice Walker, Richard Wright, and Zora Neale Hurston.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Guilty knowledge, guilty pleasure : the dirty art of poetry
    • The best of McSweeney's
      The best of McSweeney's
      edited by Dave Eggers and Jordan Bass.
      "A comprehensive collection of some of the magazine's most remarkable work."--Back of jacket.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The Norton anthology of African American literature
      The Norton anthology of African American literature
      Henry Louis Gates, Jr., General Editor, Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and American Research, Harvard University

      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The letters of Ernest Hemingway
      The letters of Ernest Hemingway
      edited by Sandra Spanier and Robert W. Trogdon.
      "The first volume encompasses his youth, his experience in World War I, and his arrival in Paris. The letters reveal a more complex person than Hemingway's tough-guy public persona would suggest: devoted son, affectionate brother, infatuated lover, adoring husband, spirited friend, and disciplined writer. Unguarded and never intended for publication, the letters record experiences that inspired his art, afford insight into his creative process, and express his candid assessments of his own work and that of his contemporaries. The letters present immediate accounts of events and relationships that profoundly shaped his life and work. A detailed introduction, notes, chronology, illustrations, and index are included."--from book jacket.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Distant neighbors : the selected letters of Wendell Berry and Gary Snyder
      Distant neighbors : the selected letters of Wendell Berry and Gary Snyder
      edited by Chad Wriglesworth.
      Shares nearly 250 letters exhanged between the authors from 1973 to 2013 on topics ranging from religion, spirituality, and environmentalism to the relationship between art and commerce.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Idiot psalms : new poems
    • Mexican Jenny and other poems
    • My father, humming : poems
    • The good counselor
      The good counselor
      by Kathryn Grant.
      A two-act play in which Vincent Heffernan, an African American lawyer, is the public defender for a single Caucasian mother accused of killing her baby. Vincent, hounded by the community and haunted by his past, battles with having to defend both his client and his ailing mother.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • On the street of divine love : new and selected poems
    • Dragonwriter : a tribute to Anne McCaffrey and Pern
      Dragonwriter : a tribute to Anne McCaffrey and Pern
      edited by Todd McCaffrey, with Leah Wilson.
      "Science fiction Grand Master Anne McCaffrey and her work, particularly her Dragonriders of Pern series, are beloved by generations of readers. She was one of the first science fiction writers to appear on the New York Times bestseller list, the first woman to win the Hugo and Nebula Awards, and an inductee to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Her death in November 2011 was met with an outpouring of grief and memories from those whose lives her stories had touched. Edited by her son Todd, Dragonwriter collects McCaffrey's friends, fans, and professional admirers to remember and pay tribute to the pioneering science fiction author, from the way her love of music and horses influenced her work to her redefinition of the SF genre"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Havana journal
      Havana journal
      by Eduardo Machado.
      "Ruth, a disillusioned writer and radical, leaves the halls of American academia to travel to Cuba. She hopes to find people there who share her beliefs and validate her struggle. It's not until her return to Columbia University that she is confronted by the realities of sacrifice and idealism."--Publisher description.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Venera : Poems
    • Adventure of ascent : field notes from a lifelong journey
      Adventure of ascent : field notes from a lifelong journey
      Luci Shaw.
      Autobiographical anecdotes with reflections on aging and a few previously published poems.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • You animal machine : (the golden Greek)
    • The zen of forgetting : poems
    • House of several stories : a tragedy in two acts of nonsense
    • Luminous other : poems
    • Ground
      Ground
      by Lisa Dillman.

      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Eternal patrol
    • William Shakespeare's the Jedi doth return
      William Shakespeare's the Jedi doth return
      by Ian Doescher
      Han Solo entombed in carbonite, the princess taken captive, the Rebel Alliance besieged, and Jabba the Hutt engorged. Now Luke Skywalker and his Rebel band must seek fresh allies in their quest to thwart construction of a new Imperial Death Star.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The next monsters
    • The self unstable
    • Eruv
      Eruv
      Eryn Green
      "Eryn Green's Eruv is the latest winner of the oldest annual literary award in the United States, which originated in 1919 to showcase the works of exceptional American poets under the age of forty. Green joins an esteemed roster of past winners that includes Adrienne Rich, John Ashbery, W. S. Merwin, and Robert Hass, and as Carl Phillips, competition judge and chancellor of the American Academy of Poets, points out, this collection "reminds us how essential wilderness is to poetry-a wilderness in terms of how form and language both reinvent and get reinvented." Taking its title from the Hebrew word for a ritual enclosure that opens from private into public spaces, Eruv includes poems of love, sadness, and pathos while celebrating the power of ritual and untamed landscapes. Just as a larger home can be fashioned out of communally shared alleyways and courtyards, with passages enabling movement from one world to another, Green's poems provide a similar doorway into a deeper understanding of ourselves"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Harry Thaw hates everybody
      Harry Thaw hates everybody
      by Laural Meade
      The real-life 1906 murder of New York's architectural eminence Stanford White at the hands of deranged coal baron Harry Thaw is the starting point for this darkly whimsical look at the clash between hedonism and poverty, the emotional toll of excess, and murderous revenge, high-society style.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Same old story
    • Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail
      Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail
      Cheryl Strayed.
      At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State -- and to do it alone. She had no experience as a long-distance hiker, and the trail was little more than "an idea, vague and outlandish and full of promise." But it was a promise of piecing back together a life that had come undone. Strayed faces down rattlesnakes and black bears, intense heat and record snowfalls, and both the beauty and loneliness of the trail on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail
      Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail
      Cheryl Strayed.
      A powerful, blazingly honest, inspiring memoir: the story of a 1,100 mile solo hike that broke down a young woman reeling from catastrophe, and built her back up again.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Mignon's afterlives : crossing cultures from Goethe to the twenty-first century
      Mignon's afterlives : crossing cultures from Goethe to the twenty-first century
      Terence Cave.
      Terence Cave traces the afterlives of Mignon, an apparently minor character in Goethe's novel Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre, through the European cultures of the 19th and 20th centuries. The enigmatic and fascinating Mignon reappears in wide range of different works, mainly narrative fiction but also poetry, song, opera, and film.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Invasion!
      Invasion!
      Jonas Hassen Khemiri

      View details »
      Place a hold »