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    • Oral history off the record : toward an ethnography of practice
    • The transformation of the world : a global history of the nineteenth century
      The transformation of the world : a global history of the nineteenth century
      Jurgen Osterhammel
      A monumental history of the nineteenth century, The Transformation of the World offers a panoramic and multifaceted portrait of a world in transition. Jurgen Osterhammel, an eminent scholar who has been called the Braudel of the nineteenth century, moves beyond conventional Eurocentric and chronological accounts of the era, presenting instead a truly global history of breathtaking scope and towering erudition. He examines the powerful and complex forces that drove global change during the "long nineteenth century," taking readers from New York to New Delhi, from the Latin American revolutions to the Taiping Rebellion, from the perils and promise of Europe's transatlantic labor markets to the hardships endured by nomadic, tribal peoples across the planet. Osterhammel describes a world increasingly networked by the telegraph, the steamship, and the railways. He explores the changing relationship between human beings and nature, looks at the importance of cities, explains the role slavery and its abolition played in the emergence of new nations, challenges the widely held belief that the nineteenth century witnessed the triumph of the nation-state, and much more. -- Provided by publisher.
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    • The month that changed the world : July 1914
      The month that changed the world : July 1914
      Gordon Martel.
      Dedicating a chapter to every day of July 1914, the author retraces the actions that led to World War I, beginning with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and following leaders of the time as they escalated the crisis.
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    • Lawrence in Arabia : war, deceit, imperial folly and the making of the modern Middle East
      Lawrence in Arabia : war, deceit, imperial folly and the making of the modern Middle East
      Scott Anderson.
      A narrative chronicle of World War I's Arab Revolt explores the pivotal roles of a small group of adventurers and low-level officers who orchestrated a secret effort to control the Middle East, demonstrating how they instigated jihad against British forces, built an elaborate intelligence ring and forged ties to gain valuable oil concessions. This is a narrative of one of the most epic and consequential periods in 20th century history, the Arab Revolt and the secret "great game " to control the Middle East. The Arab Revolt against the Turks in World War I was, in the words of T.E. Lawrence, "a sideshow of a sideshow." Amidst the slaughter in European trenches, the Western combatants paid scant attention to the Middle Eastern theater. As a result, the conflict was shaped to a remarkable degree by a small handful of adventurers and low-level officers far removed from the corridors of power. Curt Prufer was an effete academic attached to the German embassy in Cairo, whose clandestine role was to foment Islamic jihad against British rule. Aaron Aaronsohn was a renowned agronomist and committed Zionist who gained the trust of the Ottoman governor of Syria. William Yale was the fallen scion of the American aristocracy, who traveled the Ottoman Empire on behalf of Standard Oil, dissembling to the Turks in order to gain valuable oil concessions. At the center of it all was Lawrence. In early 1914 he was an archaeologist excavating ruins in the sands of Syria; by 1917 he was the most romantic figure of World War One, battling both the enemy and his own government to bring about the vision he had for the Arab people. The intertwined paths of these four men, the schemes they put in place, the battles they fought, the betrayals they endured and committed, mirror the grandeur, intrigue and tragedy of the war in the desert. Prufer became Germany's grand spymaster in the Middle East. Aaronsohn constructed an elaborate Jewish spy-ring in Palestine, only to have the anti-Semitic and bureaucratically-inept British first ignore and then misuse his organization, at tragic personal cost. Yale would become the only American intelligence agent in the entire Middle East, while still secretly on the payroll of Standard Oil. And the enigmatic Lawrence rode into legend at the head of an Arab army, even as he waged secret war against his own nation's imperial ambitions. Based on years of intensive primary document research, this work definitively overturns received wisdom on how the modern Middle East was formed. It condemns the destruction wrought by European colonial plots, and captures the way in which the folly of the past creates the anguish of the present. -- From book jacket.
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    • Q ship vs U-boat : 1914-18
    • In the shadow of Hitler : personalities of the right in Central and Eastern Europe
    • Hitler's fortresses : German fortifications and defences 1939-45
      Hitler's fortresses : German fortifications and defences 1939-45
      edited by Chris McNab.
      From the Siegfried Line to the Atlantic Wall to central Italy, this detailed guide to every level of defensive project in the Third Reich won't disappoint. It takes you inside Channel Islands' pillboxes, Normandy coastal gun positions, and emplaced tank turrets on the Gothic Line in Italy. The secretive world of Hitler's command bunkers is revealed in detail, and the principles and engineering of basic frontline defenses are explained, showing how the average German soldier prepared to stand his ground. There is also a dedicated chapter on special-purpose fortifications, including U-boat pens, V-weapon sites, and flak towers.
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    • Rising sun, falling skies : the disastrous Java Sea campaign of World War II
      Rising sun, falling skies : the disastrous Java Sea campaign of World War II
      Jeffrey R. Cox.
      In the immediate aftermath of Pearl Harbor, the Japanese juggernaut quickly racked up victory after victory. Desperate to secure resource-rich regions in the Pacific and ensure their continued dominance of South East Asia, Japanese forces were determined in their efforts to conquer Malaya, Singapore and the oil-rich islands around Java Sea - Borneo, Sumatra and Java itself. In the face of this seemingly unstoppable tide stood a small Allied force - American, Australian, British and Dutch. Thrown together by circumstance; cut off from reinforcements or in many cases retreat; operating with old, obsolete equipment and dwindling supplies, there was little hope of victory. Indeed, the month-long Java Sea Campaign, as it subsequently became known, quickly evolved from a traditional test of arms into a test of character. In the face of a relentless enemy and outnumbered, outgunned and alone, they defiantly held on, attempting to buy weeks, days, even hours until a better line of defense - and offense - could be established. These were the men of the US Asiatic Feet, the British Far Eastern Fleet, the Royal Netherlands Navy's East Indies Squadron and the Royal Australian Navy. And their supporting units like Patrol Wing Ten, the Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, the US Army Air Force's 17th Pursuit Squadron and submarines of all these fine nations. A campaign that has been too often either ignored by historians or criticised for poor command decisions, this is the story of the sailors and the airmen at the sharp end, and how they fought and endured the first months of the War in the Pacific.
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    • Elephant Company : the inspiring story of an unlikely hero and the animals who helped him save lives in World War II
      Elephant Company : the inspiring story of an unlikely hero and the animals who helped him save lives in World War II
      Vicki Constantine Croke.
      "At the onset of World War II, [Billy] Williams formed Elephant Company and was instrumental in defeating the Japanese in Burma and saving refugees, including on his own 'Hannibal Trek,' [becoming] a media sensation during the war, telling reporters that the elephants did more for him than he was ever able to do for them"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Mobilize! : Why Canada Was Unprepared for The Second World War
    • US World War II parachute infantry regiments
    • And there was light : the extraordinary memoir of a blind hero of the French resistance in World War II
      And there was light : the extraordinary memoir of a blind hero of the French resistance in World War II
      Jacques Lusseyran
      "Autobiography addressing the author's childhood experience of inner spiritual vision after becoming blind as a boy, his forming a boys' resistance group in occupied Paris at age seventeen (which later merged with Defense de la France), and his imprisonment in the Buchenwald concentration camp"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Unbroken : a World War II story of survival, resilience, and redemption
      Unbroken : a World War II story of survival, resilience, and redemption
      Laura Hillenbrand.
      On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared; it was Lt. Louis Zamperini. Captured by the Japanese and driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor. Zamperini had a troubled youth, yet honed his athletic skills and made it all the way to the 1934 Olympics in Berlin. However, what lay before him was a physical gauntlet unlike anything he had encountered before: thousands of miles of open ocean, a small raft, and no food or water. He spent forty-seven days adrift in the ocean before being rescued by the Japanese Navy, and was held as a prisoner until the end of the war.
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    • Double agent : the first hero of World War II and how the FBI outwitted and destroyed a Nazi spy ring
    • LOST IN THE PACIFIC: EPIC FIRSTHAND ACCOUNTS OF WWII SURVIVAL AGAINST IMPOSSIBLE ODDS
    • Belle : the slave daughter and the Lord Chief Justice
      Belle : the slave daughter and the Lord Chief Justice
      Paula Byrne.
      The illegitimate daughter of a captain in the Royal Navy and an enslaved African woman, Dido Belle was sent to live with her great-uncle, the Earl of Mansfield, one of the most powerful men of the time and a leading opponent of slavery. Growing up in his lavish estate, Dido was raised as a sister and companion to her white cousin, Elizabeth. When a joint portrait of the girls, commissioned by Mansfield, was unveiled, eighteenth-century England was shocked to see a black woman and white woman depicted as equals.
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    • A tale in two cities : Fanny Burney and Adele, Comtesse de Boigne
    • The Victorian city : everyday life in Dickens' London
      The Victorian city : everyday life in Dickens' London
      Judith Flanders.
      "From the critically acclaimed author of The Invention of Murder, an extraordinary, revelatory portrait of everyday life on the streets of Dickens' London.The nineteenth century was a time of unprecedented change, and nowhere was this more apparent than London. In only a few decades, the capital grew from a compact Regency town into a sprawling metropolis of 6.5 million inhabitants, the largest city the world had ever seen. Technology--railways, street-lighting, and sewers--transformed both the city and the experience of city-living, as London expanded in every direction. Now Judith Flanders, one of Britain's foremost social historians, explores the world portrayed so vividly in Dickens' novels, showing life on the streets of London in colorful, fascinating detail.From the moment Charles Dickens, the century's best-loved English novelist and London's greatest observer, arrived in the city in 1822, he obsessively walked its streets, recording its pleasures, curiosities and cruelties. Now, with him, Judith Flanders leads us through the markets, transport systems, sewers, rivers, slums, alleys, cemeteries, gin palaces, chop-houses and entertainment emporia of Dickens' London, to reveal the Victorian capital in all its variety, vibrancy, and squalor. From the colorful cries of street-sellers to the uncomfortable reality of travel by omnibus, to the many uses for the body parts of dead horses and the unimaginably grueling working days of hawker children, no detail is too small, or too strange. No one who reads Judith Flanders's meticulously researched, captivatingly written The Victorian City will ever view London in the same light again. "-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Ireland : a short history
    • Rise of an empire : how one man united Greece to defeat Xerxes's Persians
    • Hidden Tuscany : discovering art, culture, and memories in a well-known region's unknown places
    • The interior circuit : a Mexico City chronicle
      The interior circuit : a Mexico City chronicle
      Francisco Goldman.
      "Goldman's story of his emergence from grief five years after his wife's death, symbolized by his attempt to overcome his fear of driving in the city. Embracing the DF (Mexico City) as his home, Goldman explores and celebrates the city, which stands defiantly apart from so many of the social ills and violence wracking Mexico ... [and] sets out to try to understand the menacing challenges the city now faces ... [resulting in] an account of one of the world's most remarkable and often misunderstood cities"--Amazon.com.
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    • Cuba then : rare and classic images from the Ramiro A. Fernandez collection
    • Salvador Allende : revolutionary democrat