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    By Michael Dalby on

     

    If a race has no history, if it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. -Carter G. Woodson

     

    In 1926, African American scholar Carter G. Woodson established one week in the month of February as Black History Week. Woodson chose February because both Abraham Lincoln (Feburary 12, 1809) and Frederick Douglas (February 14, 1818?) were born in that month. At the time, Woodson felt that both men had made significant contributions to race relations in America. As the founder of The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Woodson did scholarly research on the contributions that African-Americans had on the United States. He then published The Journal of Negro History...

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    By Michael Dalby on

     

    The Greeks have Homeric poetry and the Indians have the Vedic literature; equally as important to Nordic culture are The Eddas. The Prose Edda and The Poetic Edda are the pre-Christian Icelandic oral traditions that were written during the medieval period. The creators and compliers of these texts had lives that were just as colorful as the material they wrote about.

     

    The Poetic Edda/Prose Edda

     

    The Poetic Edda is a collection of oral poems. For hundreds of years these poems had been orally transmitted. There is no one particular author attributed to The Poetic Edda, however some give credit to a monk called Saemundur the Learned as complier. Saemunder’s life plays a large role in some of the folklore of Iceland.

    He was said to have studied in Paris...

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    By adawson on

    Founded in 1987 by Wilhelmina Cole Holladay, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, seeks to highlight the work of women artists in all media and to educate the public about their achievements. By bringing to light remarkable women artists of the past while also promoting the best women artists working today, the museum addresses the gender imbalance in the presentation of art in the U.S. and abroad, thus assuring great women artists a place of honor now and into the future. Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the museum is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing the...

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    By Michael Dalby on

     

    If a race has no history, if it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. -Carter G. Woodson

     

    In 1926, African American scholar Carter G. Woodson established one week in the month of February as Black History Week. Woodson chose February because both Abraham Lincoln (Feburary 12, 1809) and Frederick Douglas (February 14, 1818?) were born in that month. At the time, Woodson felt that both men had made significant contributions to race relations in America. As the founder of The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Woodson did scholarly research on the contributions that African-Americans had on the United States. He then published The Journal of Negro History...

    Read More »

    By Michael Dalby on

     

    The Greeks have Homeric poetry and the Indians have the Vedic literature; equally as important to Nordic culture are The Eddas. The Prose Edda and The Poetic Edda are the pre-Christian Icelandic oral traditions that were written during the medieval period. The creators and compliers of these texts had lives that were just as colorful as the material they wrote about.

     

    The Poetic Edda/Prose Edda

     

    The Poetic Edda is a collection of oral poems. For hundreds of years these poems had been orally transmitted. There is no one particular author attributed to The Poetic Edda, however some give credit to a monk called Saemundur the Learned as complier. Saemunder’s life plays a large role in some of the folklore of Iceland.

    He was said to have studied in Paris...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    Founded in 1987 by Wilhelmina Cole Holladay, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, seeks to highlight the work of women artists in all media and to educate the public about their achievements. By bringing to light remarkable women artists of the past while also promoting the best women artists working today, the museum addresses the gender imbalance in the presentation of art in the U.S. and abroad, thus assuring great women artists a place of honor now and into the future. Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the museum is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing the...

    Read More »

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