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    By adawson on

    This past May, Cleveland celebrated its long history of performing arts by adding the world’s first outdoor chandelier to the play district on Euclid Avenue. This is a beginning to transform the PlayhouseSquare into a dynamic neighborhood. The roots of this theater pride can be seen in the CPL’s Literature Departments Theater and Entertainment Scrapbook collections. These books contain countless numbers of theater programs, play reviews, images of actors, and other ephemera showing us what the nightlife was like 100 years ago.

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    By adawson on

           The best-known blues song and most recorded song of the pre-rock era,  September 11, 2014 marked the 100th anniversary of  the publication of W.C.Handy's iconic "St. Louis Blues". 

     William Christopher Handy was born  the son of a Methodist minister in Alabama onNovember 16, 1873. He began studying music at a young age despite his father’s objections. The man who became known as “Father of the Blues” began as his musical career playing cornet in a brass band that specialized in marches, spirituals and light classical music.  It was while traveling the South in the early 1900’s; Handy developed an interest and appreciation for blues.... 



    ...

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    By adawson on

    Join in the fun ! AHA! Cleveland, winner of Cuyahoga Arts & Culture's 2013 Creative Culture Grants, is a multi-day festival of lights celebrating Cleveland's recent downtown development boom and will "illuminate" changes to our urban landscape. AHA! will bring people together from across the region to demonstrate what is possible in our beloved downtown public spaces through artist installations using light and video projections. Featured artists include Yvette Mattern, Obscura Digital, Jen Lewin, and Iván Juárez. In addition to these installations, each night will include public...

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    By adawson on

    WatsonOne does not need to be a Chess Champion, a Chess Researcher or a Chess Historian to be touched by the greatness of the John G. White Chess Collection, at the Cleveland Public Library.  The enchanting displays of chess, checkers and chess boards can literally transport one through time. 

     John G. White was a prominent Cleveland attorney who donated an impressive collection of Chess, Checkers, Folklores, and Orientalia to the Cleveland Public Library at the...

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    By adawson on

    Unequaled in his artistic and technical execution of woodcuts and engravings, 16th-century German artist Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) revolutionized the art of printmaking. The exhibition Dürer’s Women: Images of Devotion & Desire features over fifty of his impressions from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s distinguished collection of Dürer’s prints and considers the artist’s multivalent depictions of women over the course of his career. Exhibit is on display Sunday, June 22, 2014 to Sunday, September 28, 2014. The Cleveland Public Library collection...

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    By adawson on

    Mopope 1 The Kiowa Six (more commonly known as the Kiowa Five) were artists from the Kiowa Tribe, who were Plains Indians located in western Oklahoma. The artists in the group are Jack Hokeah (1900–1969), Monroe Tsatoke (1904–37), Spencer Asah (1906– 54), James Auchiah (1906–74), and Stephen Mopope (1900–1974). The sixth member was a woman, Lois Smoky (1907–81). All the artists, except Tsatoke, were educated at the St. Patrick's Mission School near Anadarko, Oklahoma....

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    By adawson on

     

    This Roll of Honor contains many Greater Cleveland men and women who served in World War II. Their names were added to the large four volume set by mothers, wives, sisters, fathers, and brothers of the men and women who were serving in all branches of the U.S. military. The book was dedicated on May 6, 1942 by  Louis B. Seltzer, editor of the Cleveland Press and Mayor Frank Lausche and given to the Cleveland Public Library to be permanently housed once the war ended.

    ...

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    By adawson on

     Albert Ayler – Jazz Artist by Bill Anderson, 2008)

    Albert Ayler expanded the expressive possibilities of jazz saxophone and helped to develop the free jazz of the 1960s. Born in Cleveland, he carried his music first to Europe and then to New York City bringing the ecstasy of gospel music into jazz. He worked with Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, and Sonny Rollins; his own groups included his brother Donald, Gary Peacock, Sunny Murray, Charles Tyler, and Ronald Shannon Jackson. He influenced his contemporaries like Rollins, John Coltrane, Eric Dolphy, and Pharoah Sanders, and is an influence today on younger...

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    By adawson on

    This past May, Cleveland celebrated its long history of performing arts by adding the world’s first outdoor chandelier to the play district on Euclid Avenue. This is a beginning to transform the PlayhouseSquare into a dynamic neighborhood. The roots of this theater pride can be seen in the CPL’s Literature Departments Theater and Entertainment Scrapbook collections. These books contain countless numbers of theater programs, play reviews, images of actors, and other ephemera showing us what the nightlife was like 100 years ago.

    Read More »

    By adawson on

           The best-known blues song and most recorded song of the pre-rock era,  September 11, 2014 marked the 100th anniversary of  the publication of W.C.Handy's iconic "St. Louis Blues". 

     William Christopher Handy was born  the son of a Methodist minister in Alabama onNovember 16, 1873. He began studying music at a young age despite his father’s objections. The man who became known as “Father of the Blues” began as his musical career playing cornet in a brass band that specialized in marches, spirituals and light classical music.  It was while traveling the South in the early 1900’s; Handy developed an interest and appreciation for blues.... 



    ...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    Join in the fun ! AHA! Cleveland, winner of Cuyahoga Arts & Culture's 2013 Creative Culture Grants, is a multi-day festival of lights celebrating Cleveland's recent downtown development boom and will "illuminate" changes to our urban landscape. AHA! will bring people together from across the region to demonstrate what is possible in our beloved downtown public spaces through artist installations using light and video projections. Featured artists include Yvette Mattern, Obscura Digital, Jen Lewin, and Iván Juárez. In addition to these installations, each night will include public...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    WatsonOne does not need to be a Chess Champion, a Chess Researcher or a Chess Historian to be touched by the greatness of the John G. White Chess Collection, at the Cleveland Public Library.  The enchanting displays of chess, checkers and chess boards can literally transport one through time. 

     John G. White was a prominent Cleveland attorney who donated an impressive collection of Chess, Checkers, Folklores, and Orientalia to the Cleveland Public Library at the...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    Unequaled in his artistic and technical execution of woodcuts and engravings, 16th-century German artist Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) revolutionized the art of printmaking. The exhibition Dürer’s Women: Images of Devotion & Desire features over fifty of his impressions from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s distinguished collection of Dürer’s prints and considers the artist’s multivalent depictions of women over the course of his career. Exhibit is on display Sunday, June 22, 2014 to Sunday, September 28, 2014. The Cleveland Public Library collection...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    Mopope 1 The Kiowa Six (more commonly known as the Kiowa Five) were artists from the Kiowa Tribe, who were Plains Indians located in western Oklahoma. The artists in the group are Jack Hokeah (1900–1969), Monroe Tsatoke (1904–37), Spencer Asah (1906– 54), James Auchiah (1906–74), and Stephen Mopope (1900–1974). The sixth member was a woman, Lois Smoky (1907–81). All the artists, except Tsatoke, were educated at the St. Patrick's Mission School near Anadarko, Oklahoma....

    Read More »

    By adawson on

     

    This Roll of Honor contains many Greater Cleveland men and women who served in World War II. Their names were added to the large four volume set by mothers, wives, sisters, fathers, and brothers of the men and women who were serving in all branches of the U.S. military. The book was dedicated on May 6, 1942 by  Louis B. Seltzer, editor of the Cleveland Press and Mayor Frank Lausche and given to the Cleveland Public Library to be permanently housed once the war ended.

    ...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

     Albert Ayler – Jazz Artist by Bill Anderson, 2008)

    Albert Ayler expanded the expressive possibilities of jazz saxophone and helped to develop the free jazz of the 1960s. Born in Cleveland, he carried his music first to Europe and then to New York City bringing the ecstasy of gospel music into jazz. He worked with Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, and Sonny Rollins; his own groups included his brother Donald, Gary Peacock, Sunny Murray, Charles Tyler, and Ronald Shannon Jackson. He influenced his contemporaries like Rollins, John Coltrane, Eric Dolphy, and Pharoah Sanders, and is an influence today on younger...

    Read More »

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